Sunday, July 1, 2012

Heat Wave!!!!

With no relief in sight the majority of the United States will be experiencing high temperatures for the rest of the week.

From NOAA:
..HEAT ADVISORIES REMAIN IN EFFECT ACROSS THE SOUTHEAST AND LOWER HALF OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY WITH TRIPLE-DIGIT TEMPERATURES EXPECTED ACROSS THE SOUTHERN THIRD OF THE COUNTRY...

...CENTRAL PLAINS...MIDWEST AND EAST CENTRAL STATES EXPECTED TO RECEIVE SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS TONIGHT AND SUNDAY...

HIGH PRESSURE ANCHORED ACROSS THE SOUTHWEST...SOUTHERN PLAINS AND SOUTHEAST WILL KEEP THE HOT...HUMID DOME OF STABLE AIR IN PLACE ALONG AND SOUTH OF THE I-40 CORRIDOR FROM EASTERN ARIZONA...ALL THE WAY TO NORTH CAROLINA TONIGHT THROUGH MONDAY MORNING. LITTLE IF ANY RELIEF IS IN THE FORECAST...ASIDE FROM A WEAKENING FRONT SAGGING SLOWLY SOUTHWARD THROUGH THE MIDWEST...OHIO VALLEY AND MID-ATLANTIC STATES...WHERE STRONG THUNDERSTORMS ROLLED THROUGH YESTERDAY. SOUTH OF THIS FRONT...DAYTIME HIGH TEMPERATURES WILL CONTINUE TO BRUSH UP AGAINST THE TRIPLE-DIGIT DEGREE MARK OR HIGHER. COMBINED WITH NIGHT TIME LOW TEMPERATURES IN THE UPPER 70S TO AROUND 80...AND CLOSER TO THE MIDDLE AND UPPER 80S IN THE DESERT SOUTHWEST...IT IS VERY UNSAFE OUTDOORS FOR THOSE SUSCEPTIBLE TO THESE EXTREME CONDITIONS. ONLY ACROSS THE SOUTH TEXAS COAST...IS SIGNIFICANT RAINFALL PREVENTING THE TEMPERATURES FROM REACHING THESE DANGEROUS VALUES.

ACROSS THE CENTRAL PLAINS AND EASTWARD THROUGH THE MIDWEST AND NORTHEAST...ANOTHER ROUND OF SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS IS EXPECTED TONIGHT AND SUNDAY. SOME STORMS COULD BE SEVERE...WITH LARGE HAIL AND DAMAGING WINDS. MUCH IF NOT ALL THE SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS WILL DEVELOP ALONG AND NORTH OF A STATIONARY FRONT DRAPED FROM THE DAKOTAS...THROUGH THE MIDWEST...TO THE OHIO VALLEY AND DELMARVA. SUNDAY NIGHT AND MONDAY...THE LEADING EDGE OF A PACIFIC COLD FRONT AND ASSOCIATED SURFACE LOW ARE EXPECTED TO BRING ORGANIZED OF PRECIPITATION AND THUNDERSTORMS TO THE NORTHERN PLAINS AND UPPER MIDWEST.

OUT WEST...

A SERIES OF PACIFIC FRONTS WILL MIGRATE THROUGH THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST...THE NORTHERN ROCKIES AND NORTHERN GREAT BASIN...BRINGING THE THREAT OF SHOWERS TO PORTIONS OF WASHINGTON AND OREGON...ALONG WITH THUNDERSTORMS IN THE MOUNTAINS OF IDAHO AND WESTERN MONTANA. TEMPERATURES WILL REMAIN ON THE COOL SIDE...AND ESPECIALLY AT NIGHT...WITH BELOW NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURES. HOWEVER...NOT MUCH CHANGE ACROSS THE SOUTHWEST IN THE WAKE OF THESE PACIFIC SYSTEMS WITH HIGH PRESSURE IN THE UPPER LEVELS OF THE ATMOSPHERE ANCHORED IN THE FOUR CORNERS AND EXPECTED TO REMAIN THERE THROUGH THE NEXT 60 HOURS.

There have been deaths, and the state of West Virginia has no power.
Multiple governors declared emergencies as temperatures rose in the aftermath of powerful storms that swept through the mid-Atlantic region Friday night, resulting in at least 13 deaths and leaving more than three million without power.

Under the statewide emergency declaration, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and Ohio, can utilize all government resources immediately to help those in need. The District of Columbia also declared a state of emergency.

Gov. John Kasich cited widespread power losses in Ohio, utility damages and excessive heat that could create crisis conditions for some Ohioans. State emergency officials say 800,000 to 1 million people still had power outages Saturday morning.

West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin declared a state of emergency after more than 500,000 customers in 27 counties were left without electricity. Current estimates have 688,000 people without power in the state. Tomblin's office says the state is running out of fuel and they're fearful that they will run out of gas.

Also in West Virginia, 232 Amtrak passengers spent Friday night on a train that was blocked on both sides by trees that fell on the tracks..

On Saturday night, the train passengers stranded near rural Prince, West Virginia, were loaded into buses after they got stuck at 11 p.m. the previous evening, said Amtrak spokesman Steve Kulm. Kulm said the train bound from New York to Chicago had power, so lights and air conditioning were working. He said that since it's a long-distance train, it was stocked with food and crew members were able to get to town to buy more.

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell said the state had its largest non-hurricane power outage in its history. There are 2.5 million without power.

The storm did damage from Indiana to New Jersey, although the bulk of it was in West Virginia, Washington and suburban Virginia and Maryland.

Two boys at a New Jersey campsite, ages 7 and 2, killed in a tent when a tree fell early Saturday morning, authorities said.

There were six reported deaths in Virginia, including a 90-year-old woman asleep in bed when a tree slammed into her home, a police spokeswoman said Saturday. Another man was killed by a falling tree while watching the storm from his deck and a woman died after she, too, was hit by a falling tree after she got out of her car to observe a downed tree. Both those deaths occurred in Albermarle County, Va. A fallen tree also killed a man driving in Maryland, and another resident was killed in a separate incident. A woman was also killed when a barn collapsed in Ohio.

Two were killed in Maryland, one in Ohio, one in Kentucky and one in Washington.

Widespread power outages were reported from Indiana to New Jersey, with the bulk of the service interruptions concentrated on Washington, D.C., and the surrounding areas. Earlier Friday, the nation's capital reached 104 degrees -- topping a record of 101 set in 1934.

More than 20 elderly residents at an apartment home in Indianapolis were displaced when the facility lost power due to a downed tree. Most were bused to a Red Cross facility to spend the night, and others who depend on oxygen assistance were given other accommodations, the fire department said.

The storms, sometimes packing 70 mph winds, toppled three tractor trailers on Interstate 75 near Findlay, Ohio.

"Our officers and firefighters are out there with power saws, trying to clear the streets," Jennings said.

At least four utility poles fell on a road in Columbus, Ohio, making it too dangerous for people in four cars to get out, police said. One person was taken to a hospital.

As of 1 a.m. Saturday, Pepco was reporting 406,000 outages in the District of Columbia and Montgomery and Prince George's counties, Md.

"We have more than half our system down," said Pepco spokeswoman Myra Oppel. "This is definitely going to be a multi-day outage."

Amtrak suspended its service from Washington, D.C., to Philadelphia due to the storms, at least until mid-morning. Dulles Airport in Northern Virginia reporting some power issues with a computer system that handles airline departure/arrival information.

In the Washington, D.C., area, the Metrorail subway trains were returned to their endpoints due to the storms and related damage, officials said.

"It has had a widespread effect on the region," Metro spokesman Dan Stessel said early Saturday. He said about 17 train stations were operating on backup power due to local power outages, but that he didn't anticipate service being disrupted on Saturday.

Source
Our condolences go out to the families of those killed at this time and our prayers are with those who are suffering in this heat.

We hope that everyone will find a way to stay cool, be safe and that the heat finally ends.

And this little ditty by Martha and the Vandellas just might help.





Stay Cool, Stay Safe!!!

8 comments:

PatriotUSA said...

Are you able to stay cool????

Findalis said...

Staying cool with fans, a good breeze and only turning on the AC when it hits 90+.

Raining right now with high winds. Heat at 80. It feels wonderful!

Praying that you stay cool too.

PatriotUSA said...

WE have it easy here most of time. We are at 3,000' on the east side of the Cascades, high desert. Winters can be a bit cranky but we have it easy almost all the time compared to the rest of the country.

Bigfoot said...

I was one of the Maryland residents who lost power (as I indicated when calling into Minsota's BTR show). It came back around 6:00 this evening.

Marsha Lowell said...

I know how you feel. As a resident of Colorado, my main focus this summer has been keeping out of the three digit temperatures we’ve been experiencing. I consider myself one of the lucky ones to have working AC in my home and office at Dish. I have switched to a life of the indoors since it is impossible to enjoy my usual summer activities of biking and hiking. It even remains around 80 degrees long after the sun has set! The only way to manage is with a cold drink in my hand and a good movie on TV. My DVR hasn’t seen this much action in quite some time! Fortunately, I have the Hopper DVR that is capable of recording up to three things at once or else there would be a lot of fights in my household. With the kids out of school and unable to partake in their usual summer rock climbing trips, they have taken up life in the great indoors as well! Good luck out there everyone! Make sure to stay cool and hydrated!

Marsha Lowell said...

I know how you feel. As a resident of Colorado, my main focus this summer has been keeping out of the three digit temperatures we’ve been experiencing. I consider myself one of the lucky ones to have working AC in my home and office at Dish. I have switched to a life of the indoors since it is impossible to enjoy my usual summer activities of biking and hiking. It even remains around 80 degrees long after the sun has set! The only way to manage is with a cold drink in my hand and a good movie on TV. My DVR hasn’t seen this much action in quite some time! Fortunately, I have the Hopper DVR that is capable of recording up to three things at once or else there would be a lot of fights in my household. With the kids out of school and unable to partake in their usual summer rock climbing trips, they have taken up life in the great indoors as well! Good luck out there everyone! Make sure to stay cool and hydrated!

Findalis said...

Stay safe Marsha. My prayers go out to you and yours.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Wow. American weather doesn't recognize half-measures, it seems. Take care.